Look at the stars, not your feet


Stuff from a girl who loves science and classic rock, but should really stop bringing her dignity to school as she is always losing it.

itscolossal:

Slow Life: A Macro Timelapse of Coral, Sponges and Other Aquatic Organisms Created from 150,000 Photographs [VIDEO]
itscolossal:

Slow Life: A Macro Timelapse of Coral, Sponges and Other Aquatic Organisms Created from 150,000 Photographs [VIDEO]
itscolossal:

Slow Life: A Macro Timelapse of Coral, Sponges and Other Aquatic Organisms Created from 150,000 Photographs [VIDEO]
itscolossal:

Slow Life: A Macro Timelapse of Coral, Sponges and Other Aquatic Organisms Created from 150,000 Photographs [VIDEO]
aparticularlygoodfinder:

#IT’S JOINED THE CHOIR INVISIBLE #IF IT WASN’T NAILED TO THE PERCH IT WOULD BE PUSHING UP THE DAISIES #IT’S PINING FOR THE FJORDS
aparticularlygoodfinder:

#IT’S JOINED THE CHOIR INVISIBLE #IF IT WASN’T NAILED TO THE PERCH IT WOULD BE PUSHING UP THE DAISIES #IT’S PINING FOR THE FJORDS
aparticularlygoodfinder:

#IT’S JOINED THE CHOIR INVISIBLE #IF IT WASN’T NAILED TO THE PERCH IT WOULD BE PUSHING UP THE DAISIES #IT’S PINING FOR THE FJORDS
aparticularlygoodfinder:

#IT’S JOINED THE CHOIR INVISIBLE #IF IT WASN’T NAILED TO THE PERCH IT WOULD BE PUSHING UP THE DAISIES #IT’S PINING FOR THE FJORDS
theimprobablenone:

MOST UNDERRATED MOVIE QUOTE EVER
theimprobablenone:

MOST UNDERRATED MOVIE QUOTE EVER
theimprobablenone:

MOST UNDERRATED MOVIE QUOTE EVER
neurosciencestuff:

Hearing with the skull
The ear is an important organ that allows us to perceive the world around us. However, very few of us are aware that not only the ear cup but also our skull bone can receive and conduct sounds. Tatjana Tchumatchenko from the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research in Frankfurt and Tobias Reichenbach from Imperial College London have now developed a new model explaining how the vibrations of the surrounding bone and the basilar membrane are coupled. These new results can be important for the development of new headphones and hearing devices.
Our sense of hearing, which is the ability to perceive sounds, arises exclusively in the inner ear. When sound waves travel through the air and reach our ear canal they cause different regions of the basilar membrane in the inner ear to vibrate. Which regions of the membrane they vibrate depends on their frequency. It is these microscopic vibrations of the membrane that we perceive as sound. However, the inner ear is surrounded by a bone that can also vibrate.
With the help of fluid dynamics calculations Tchumatchenko and Reichenbach have now discovered that the vibrations of the bone and basilar membrane are coupled. In other words, they can also mutually excite each other.
This gives rise to fascinating phenomena which, thanks to the new model, can now be understood: For example, two sounds with slightly different frequencies that arrive in the inner ear at the same time can overlap and excite the same regions on the basilar membrane. In this case, combination tones, or so-called otoacoustic emissions, are produced in the inner ear through the nonlinearity of the membrane. Precisely how these sounds leave the inner ear and how they spread inside the cochlea is currently a matter of scientific debate. “In our study we have shown that the combination tones can leave the inner ear in the form of a fast wave along the bone surface, and not, as previously assumed, by a wave along the basilar membrane,” explains Tatjana Tchumatchenko from the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research.
Moreover, the new model proves that the travelling waves along the basilar membrane can be generated by both the vibrations of the cochlear bone and the vibrations of the air inside the ear canal. “Our results provide an elegant explanation for this long-known but poorly understood observation,” says Tobias Reichenbach from Imperial College London.
These results will help advance our understanding of the complex interaction between the dynamics of fluids and the mechanics of the bone. This understanding can prove essential for ever more fascinating future clinical and commercial applications of bone conduction, such new-generation hearing aids and combinations between headphones and glasses.
castielsgayagenda:

unejeuneidiote:

unclefather:

thinkintrixxter:

toomanyfandomssolittletime:

tHIS IS THE YEAR WOMEN FINALLY SAID “FUCK YOU” TO SEXISM
YOU GO , GIRL.

'not that you're the genius'

questioning her intelligence when he has that hair cut in 2014

BAAAAAAAM, for fuck’s sake!!

LET ME TELL YOU SOMETHING ABOUT MAYIM BIALIK. 
FOR YEARS AS A KID AND TEEN, SHE BALANCED SCHOOL AND ACTING, NEVER ONCE LETTING HER GRADES DROP OR HER CAREER SUFFER. 
SHE GRADUATED HIGH SCHOOL AT THE TOP OF HER CLASS, AND WAS ACCEPTED TO HARVARD AND YALE BUT CHOSE TO GO TO UCLA BECAUSE SHE WANTED TO STAY CLOSE TO HER FAMILY. 
SHE EARNED A BACHELORS IN NEUROSCIENCE, HEBREW STUDIES, AND JEWISH STUDIES ALL AT THE SAME TIME.
SHE THEN WENT ON TO GET HER DOCTORATE AND A Ph.D. IN NEUROSCIENCE, WHILE BALANCING AN ACTING CAREER AND MOTHERHOOD.
SHE HAS BEEN THE BUTT OF SO MANY FASHION JOKES AND ANTI-SEMETIC JOKES IN HOLLYWOOD. WHEN PEOPLE SAW HER AS AMY, THEY RIDICULED HER ONLINE. 
BUT SHE STUCK WITH IT. BECAUSE SHE IS A BEAUTIFUL AND AMAZING PERSON AND IS HAVING NONE OF THIS “WOMEN CAN’T BE SUCCESSFUL AND SMART BULLSHIT. 
SHE IS ALSO A NOW-SINGLE MOM OF TWO BOYS. AND STILL KEEPS HER CAREERS (YES THAT’S FUCKING PLURAL) ACTIVE.
BUT YET, PEOPLE STILL HAVE THE AUDACITY TO ASK HER STUPID FUCKING SEXIST QUESTIONS THAT THEY WOULD NEVER GIVE, SAY, JIM PARSONS OR JOHNNY GALECKI. 
MAYIM BIALIK IS A FUCKING ICON. 
castielsgayagenda:

unejeuneidiote:

unclefather:

thinkintrixxter:

toomanyfandomssolittletime:

tHIS IS THE YEAR WOMEN FINALLY SAID “FUCK YOU” TO SEXISM
YOU GO , GIRL.

'not that you're the genius'

questioning her intelligence when he has that hair cut in 2014

BAAAAAAAM, for fuck’s sake!!

LET ME TELL YOU SOMETHING ABOUT MAYIM BIALIK. 
FOR YEARS AS A KID AND TEEN, SHE BALANCED SCHOOL AND ACTING, NEVER ONCE LETTING HER GRADES DROP OR HER CAREER SUFFER. 
SHE GRADUATED HIGH SCHOOL AT THE TOP OF HER CLASS, AND WAS ACCEPTED TO HARVARD AND YALE BUT CHOSE TO GO TO UCLA BECAUSE SHE WANTED TO STAY CLOSE TO HER FAMILY. 
SHE EARNED A BACHELORS IN NEUROSCIENCE, HEBREW STUDIES, AND JEWISH STUDIES ALL AT THE SAME TIME.
SHE THEN WENT ON TO GET HER DOCTORATE AND A Ph.D. IN NEUROSCIENCE, WHILE BALANCING AN ACTING CAREER AND MOTHERHOOD.
SHE HAS BEEN THE BUTT OF SO MANY FASHION JOKES AND ANTI-SEMETIC JOKES IN HOLLYWOOD. WHEN PEOPLE SAW HER AS AMY, THEY RIDICULED HER ONLINE. 
BUT SHE STUCK WITH IT. BECAUSE SHE IS A BEAUTIFUL AND AMAZING PERSON AND IS HAVING NONE OF THIS “WOMEN CAN’T BE SUCCESSFUL AND SMART BULLSHIT. 
SHE IS ALSO A NOW-SINGLE MOM OF TWO BOYS. AND STILL KEEPS HER CAREERS (YES THAT’S FUCKING PLURAL) ACTIVE.
BUT YET, PEOPLE STILL HAVE THE AUDACITY TO ASK HER STUPID FUCKING SEXIST QUESTIONS THAT THEY WOULD NEVER GIVE, SAY, JIM PARSONS OR JOHNNY GALECKI. 
MAYIM BIALIK IS A FUCKING ICON. 
we-are-star-stuff:

Congdon’s Anatomical Museum
we-are-star-stuff:

Congdon’s Anatomical Museum
we-are-star-stuff:

Congdon’s Anatomical Museum
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

New Quilled Paper Anatomy by Lisa Nilsson 
Paper artist Lisa Nilsson (previously) recently completed a number of new anatomical pieces using her profoundly incredible skill with quilling, a tedious process where paper is tightly wound into small rolls and then assembled into larger artworks. The natural formation of the paper coupled with Nilsson’s ability to identify the precise materials to mimic organic structures makes each artwork appear uncannily like actual cross-sections of humans and animals. The artist has a number of new works currently on display at the Boston Art Gallery as part of the exhibition Teaching the Body: Artistic Anatomy in the American Academy through March 31, 2013.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

New Quilled Paper Anatomy by Lisa Nilsson 
Paper artist Lisa Nilsson (previously) recently completed a number of new anatomical pieces using her profoundly incredible skill with quilling, a tedious process where paper is tightly wound into small rolls and then assembled into larger artworks. The natural formation of the paper coupled with Nilsson’s ability to identify the precise materials to mimic organic structures makes each artwork appear uncannily like actual cross-sections of humans and animals. The artist has a number of new works currently on display at the Boston Art Gallery as part of the exhibition Teaching the Body: Artistic Anatomy in the American Academy through March 31, 2013.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

New Quilled Paper Anatomy by Lisa Nilsson 
Paper artist Lisa Nilsson (previously) recently completed a number of new anatomical pieces using her profoundly incredible skill with quilling, a tedious process where paper is tightly wound into small rolls and then assembled into larger artworks. The natural formation of the paper coupled with Nilsson’s ability to identify the precise materials to mimic organic structures makes each artwork appear uncannily like actual cross-sections of humans and animals. The artist has a number of new works currently on display at the Boston Art Gallery as part of the exhibition Teaching the Body: Artistic Anatomy in the American Academy through March 31, 2013.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

New Quilled Paper Anatomy by Lisa Nilsson 
Paper artist Lisa Nilsson (previously) recently completed a number of new anatomical pieces using her profoundly incredible skill with quilling, a tedious process where paper is tightly wound into small rolls and then assembled into larger artworks. The natural formation of the paper coupled with Nilsson’s ability to identify the precise materials to mimic organic structures makes each artwork appear uncannily like actual cross-sections of humans and animals. The artist has a number of new works currently on display at the Boston Art Gallery as part of the exhibition Teaching the Body: Artistic Anatomy in the American Academy through March 31, 2013.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

New Quilled Paper Anatomy by Lisa Nilsson 
Paper artist Lisa Nilsson (previously) recently completed a number of new anatomical pieces using her profoundly incredible skill with quilling, a tedious process where paper is tightly wound into small rolls and then assembled into larger artworks. The natural formation of the paper coupled with Nilsson’s ability to identify the precise materials to mimic organic structures makes each artwork appear uncannily like actual cross-sections of humans and animals. The artist has a number of new works currently on display at the Boston Art Gallery as part of the exhibition Teaching the Body: Artistic Anatomy in the American Academy through March 31, 2013.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

New Quilled Paper Anatomy by Lisa Nilsson 
Paper artist Lisa Nilsson (previously) recently completed a number of new anatomical pieces using her profoundly incredible skill with quilling, a tedious process where paper is tightly wound into small rolls and then assembled into larger artworks. The natural formation of the paper coupled with Nilsson’s ability to identify the precise materials to mimic organic structures makes each artwork appear uncannily like actual cross-sections of humans and animals. The artist has a number of new works currently on display at the Boston Art Gallery as part of the exhibition Teaching the Body: Artistic Anatomy in the American Academy through March 31, 2013.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

New Quilled Paper Anatomy by Lisa Nilsson 
Paper artist Lisa Nilsson (previously) recently completed a number of new anatomical pieces using her profoundly incredible skill with quilling, a tedious process where paper is tightly wound into small rolls and then assembled into larger artworks. The natural formation of the paper coupled with Nilsson’s ability to identify the precise materials to mimic organic structures makes each artwork appear uncannily like actual cross-sections of humans and animals. The artist has a number of new works currently on display at the Boston Art Gallery as part of the exhibition Teaching the Body: Artistic Anatomy in the American Academy through March 31, 2013.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

New Quilled Paper Anatomy by Lisa Nilsson 
Paper artist Lisa Nilsson (previously) recently completed a number of new anatomical pieces using her profoundly incredible skill with quilling, a tedious process where paper is tightly wound into small rolls and then assembled into larger artworks. The natural formation of the paper coupled with Nilsson’s ability to identify the precise materials to mimic organic structures makes each artwork appear uncannily like actual cross-sections of humans and animals. The artist has a number of new works currently on display at the Boston Art Gallery as part of the exhibition Teaching the Body: Artistic Anatomy in the American Academy through March 31, 2013.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

New Quilled Paper Anatomy by Lisa Nilsson 
Paper artist Lisa Nilsson (previously) recently completed a number of new anatomical pieces using her profoundly incredible skill with quilling, a tedious process where paper is tightly wound into small rolls and then assembled into larger artworks. The natural formation of the paper coupled with Nilsson’s ability to identify the precise materials to mimic organic structures makes each artwork appear uncannily like actual cross-sections of humans and animals. The artist has a number of new works currently on display at the Boston Art Gallery as part of the exhibition Teaching the Body: Artistic Anatomy in the American Academy through March 31, 2013.
f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

New Quilled Paper Anatomy by Lisa Nilsson 
Paper artist Lisa Nilsson (previously) recently completed a number of new anatomical pieces using her profoundly incredible skill with quilling, a tedious process where paper is tightly wound into small rolls and then assembled into larger artworks. The natural formation of the paper coupled with Nilsson’s ability to identify the precise materials to mimic organic structures makes each artwork appear uncannily like actual cross-sections of humans and animals. The artist has a number of new works currently on display at the Boston Art Gallery as part of the exhibition Teaching the Body: Artistic Anatomy in the American Academy through March 31, 2013.
beautyofmicroscopy:

Cross-section of Cymbopogon citratus, better known as lemon grass.
Via biophotos on flickr.
ageofdestruction:

beth: Mars, photographed by Mars Express, 11th June 2014.
9 images taken with the Mars Webcam. I think we are looking down on the northern hemisphere, around noon on Arabia Terra, Ls 144.2° - northern midsummer. equivalent to terrestrial August..
Image credit: ESA. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.
showslow:

My sculptures are all constructed with recycled materials — old CDs, computer hard drives etc, so I classify my work as “sustainable art”. They’re a lot of fun to make, but they take an extremely long time to finish, so I don’t do a lot of them.
Animal Sculptures Made Of Shattered CDs by Sean Avery.
showslow:

My sculptures are all constructed with recycled materials — old CDs, computer hard drives etc, so I classify my work as “sustainable art”. They’re a lot of fun to make, but they take an extremely long time to finish, so I don’t do a lot of them.
Animal Sculptures Made Of Shattered CDs by Sean Avery.
showslow:

My sculptures are all constructed with recycled materials — old CDs, computer hard drives etc, so I classify my work as “sustainable art”. They’re a lot of fun to make, but they take an extremely long time to finish, so I don’t do a lot of them.
Animal Sculptures Made Of Shattered CDs by Sean Avery.
showslow:

My sculptures are all constructed with recycled materials — old CDs, computer hard drives etc, so I classify my work as “sustainable art”. They’re a lot of fun to make, but they take an extremely long time to finish, so I don’t do a lot of them.
Animal Sculptures Made Of Shattered CDs by Sean Avery.
showslow:

My sculptures are all constructed with recycled materials — old CDs, computer hard drives etc, so I classify my work as “sustainable art”. They’re a lot of fun to make, but they take an extremely long time to finish, so I don’t do a lot of them.
Animal Sculptures Made Of Shattered CDs by Sean Avery.

morgan4816:

geometricdeathtrap:

noemail:

PEOPLE WHO ARE NOT EXCITED ABOUT SPACE BAFFLE ME LIKE THEY JUST FOUND A PLANET WHERE IT RAINS GLASS AND IT RAINS SIDEWAYS ITS LIKE YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO HOW CAN U NOT CARE IF U CANT BE EXCITED ABOUT SPACE GET OUT MY FACE

THERE IS A SUPER MASSIVE CLOUD OF DRINKABLE ALCOHOL FLOATING AROUND IN SPACE AND FROM WHAT WE CAN TELL SO FAR IT’S RASPBERRY FLAVORED OKAY

image

331,682 notes

s-c-i-guy:

actually me
cubebreaker:

In his series, The Good Badlands, photographer Guy Tal seeks to show us that though it is often hidden, and may only appear briefly, there is delicate and subtle beauty in abundance for any viewer with patience and desire.
cubebreaker:

In his series, The Good Badlands, photographer Guy Tal seeks to show us that though it is often hidden, and may only appear briefly, there is delicate and subtle beauty in abundance for any viewer with patience and desire.
cubebreaker:

In his series, The Good Badlands, photographer Guy Tal seeks to show us that though it is often hidden, and may only appear briefly, there is delicate and subtle beauty in abundance for any viewer with patience and desire.
cubebreaker:

In his series, The Good Badlands, photographer Guy Tal seeks to show us that though it is often hidden, and may only appear briefly, there is delicate and subtle beauty in abundance for any viewer with patience and desire.
cubebreaker:

In his series, The Good Badlands, photographer Guy Tal seeks to show us that though it is often hidden, and may only appear briefly, there is delicate and subtle beauty in abundance for any viewer with patience and desire.
cubebreaker:

In his series, The Good Badlands, photographer Guy Tal seeks to show us that though it is often hidden, and may only appear briefly, there is delicate and subtle beauty in abundance for any viewer with patience and desire.
cubebreaker:

In his series, The Good Badlands, photographer Guy Tal seeks to show us that though it is often hidden, and may only appear briefly, there is delicate and subtle beauty in abundance for any viewer with patience and desire.
atomicallena:

xysciences:

Nitrogen triiodide is so sensitive it can be detonated with a feather.
[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

The GIF above is from a YouTube video from Sully Science.

Nitrogen triiodide is an extremely sensitive contact explosive that when touched or vibrated lightly will detonate and produce a gorgeous purple-pink cloud of iodine vapour. Nitrogen triiodide can also be detonated when exposed to alpha particles and nuclear fission products, being the only known chemical explosive to do so.
The sensitivity and instability of nitrogen triiodide can be explained by (1) the steric strain caused by the large iodine atoms (indicated by the purple balls in the space-filling model shown below) that are close together (this lowers the activation energy) and (2) the favourable formation of N2. (via)

(Read more in the post where I talk more about nitrogen triiodide)